PullTogetherTimeLine1
PullTogetherTimeLine-2

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A Pull Together Timeline

Nov 2014: Pull Together launched

What started with a spaghetti dinner in Terrace raises almost $350,000 in just over six months.  Volunteers from across BC organize 87 community fundraising events, 37 businesses  contribute and more than 3,300 individuals donate.

Nov  2016: Enbridge cancelled

After more than a decade of fighting the project at community rallies, shareholder meetings and in the courts, Northern Gateway is finally dead.

Nov 2016: Kinder Morgan/TMX project approved

The Canadian government officially gives the stamp of approval to Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain expansion. A new round of Pull Together: The People vs. Kinder Morgan, is launched immediately. 

May 2018: Canada buys TMX

Incredibly, as Texas oil giant walks away from beleaguered TMX, Canada steps in to use taxpayers money to buy the aging pipeline and finance the expansion project.

August 2018: TMX QUASHED!!

Federal Court of Appeal overturns the Canadian government’s approval of TMX, saying Canada 'fell well short of the mark' on consultation with First Nations. Court orders Canada to go back to the drawing board and redo the approvals process: construction halted.

June 2019: TMX re-approved

Canada announces re-approval of TMX without making significant accommodations of First Nations concerns. Legal experts anticipate a new round of legal challenges to the project could succeed based on inadequate consultation and conflict of interest given Canada (the owner of the pipeline) also acted as consultative and regulatory agent.

July 2019: Indigenous Nations file new cases, Pull Together relaunches

Confident of another win, Tsleil Waututh, Squamish, Goldwater and Secwepmec Nations join forces to Pull Together with concerned citizens and launch legal challenges against TMX. In just one month, $75k is raised.

The movement to protect our climate and our communities from the Trans Mountain pipeline and tanker project has incredible momentum. All across the country and around the world, allies are organizing community events, using their online networks to fundraise, and making generous donations — building a people-powered movement in solidarity with powerful Indigenous leaders.

Who knew stopping a pipeline would be so much fun?